The Body of Benin

The Body of Benin is a mens studies institute devoted to an African/ Black male centered approach toward informed and validated gender research. Here readers will find an assembly of peer reviewed articles with key data supporting stances on controversial topics affecting the male sex as well as masculine gender expression and inclusive masculinity. The unique place that understanding black male sexuality holds comes out of the fact that like in feminism (womanism) black men have also had the shared experience of being chattel breeding property be it enslaved by Europeans or eunuchs serving Arab caliphates. From having a purely relative valuable and being less reproductive functional and therefore disposable, the African/ Black male experience brings a unique perspective in identifying inherent gender value.

I’ve used the title, “The Body of Benin” for this institution or body of research as ways to reclaim an ancestral evolutionary inheritance of all black men–and intrinsically all human men–that is stolen from us by non-democratic, nepotist and parasitic actors. As symbiotic beings we all must have autonomy and interdependence and value be it in how we express our gender and how we value and find meaning in what it is to be born with a cock, testicles, vas deferens, glans penis, foreskin, shaft, etc. It is our unique and valuable experience to understand the catharsis of cumming and seeding, as normal and natural as the world of fauna that release pollen from their stamens in the spring. Please utilize the following articles in your own research as well as provide any suggestions to qamar.bradford@qabproserv.com

 

Hundt, N. E., Barrera, T. L., Arney, J., & Stanley, M. A. (2016). “It’s Worth It in the End”: Veterans’ Experiences in Prolonged Exposure and Cognitive Processing Therapy. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice.

Landy, R. (2006) The future of drama therapy. The Arts in psychotherapy 33(2): 135-142.

Steve M. Dorman. (1997) Video and Computer Games: Effect on Children and Implications for Health Education. Journal of School Health 67:10.1111/josh.1997.67.issue-4, 133-138

Kedem-Tahar, E., & Felix-Kellermann, P. (1996). Psychodrama and drama therapy: A comparison. The Arts in Psychotherapy, 23(1), 27-36.

Fine, M., & McClelland, S. (2006). Sexuality education and desire: Still missing after all these years. Harvard Educational Review, 76(3), 297-338.

Torgrimson, B. N., & Minson, C. T. (2005). Sex and gender: what is the difference? Journal of Applied Physiology 2005 99:3, 785-787.

Courtenay, W. H. (2000). Constructions of masculinity and their influence on men’s well-being: a theory of gender and health. Social science & medicine, 50(10), 1385-1401.

Nancy Krieger; Genders, sexes, and health: what are the connections—and why does it matter?, International Journal of Epidemiology, Volume 32, Issue 4, 1 August 2003, Pages 652–657, https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyg156

Ernst, M. M., Liao, L. M., Baratz, A. B., & Sandberg, D. E. (2018). Disorders of Sex Development/Intersex: Gaps in Psychosocial Care for Children. Pediatrics, e20174045.

Griffiths, D. A. (2018). Shifting syndromes: Sex chromosome variations and intersex classifications. Social studies of science, 48(1), 125-148.

http://www.ericandersonphd.com/resources/2008%20’Being%20Masculine%20is%20not%20about%20who%20you%20Sleep%20with…’%20Heterosexual%20Athletes%20Contesting%20Masculinity%20and%20the%20One-Time%20Rule%20of%20Homosexuality%20%5BSex%20Roles%5D.pdf

Anderson, E. (2008). “Being masculine is not about who you sleep with…:” heterosexual athletes contesting masculinity and the one-time rule of homosexuality. Sex roles58(1-2), 104-115. https://blog.kareldonk.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/Gender_and_Erotic_Plasticity__Sociocultural_Influences_on_the_Sex_Drive.pdf

Baumeister, R. F. (2004). Gender and erotic plasticity: Sociocultural influences on the sex drive. Sexual and relationship therapy19(2), 133-139. http://www.academia.edu/download/36210636/Fisher___Kinsey_2014_Behind_Closed_Doors.pdf

Fisher, V., & Kinsey, S. (2014). Behind closed doors! Homosocial desire and the academic boys club. Gender in management: An international Journal29(1), 44-64. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/15299710903316661

Fahs, B. (2009). Compulsory bisexuality?: The challenges of modern sexual fluidity. Journal of Bisexuality9(3-4), 431-449. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Scott_Kiesling2/publication/231906968_Homosocial_desire_in_men%27s_talk_Balancing_and_re-creating_cultural_discourses_of_masculinity/links/00b49525bc7b05f44a000000.pdf

Kiesling, S. F. (2005). Homosocial desire in men’s talk: Balancing and re-creating cultural discourses of masculinity. Language in Society34(5), 695-726. http://research.gold.ac.uk/11135/1/Hickey-Moody%20-%20Carbon%20-%20SUBMISSION.doc

Hickey-Moody, A. (2015). CARBON FIBRE MASCULINITY: disability and surfaces of homosociality. Angelaki20(1), 139-153.

Fine, M., & McClelland, S. (2006). Sexuality education and desire: Still missing after all these years. Harvard Educational Review, 76(3), 297-338.

Torgrimson, B. N., & Minson, C. T. (2005). Sex and gender: what is the difference? Journal of Applied Physiology 2005 99:3, 785-787.

Courtenay, W. H. (2000). Constructions of masculinity and their influence on men’s well-being: a theory of gender and health. Social science & medicine, 50(10), 1385-1401.

Nancy Krieger; Genders, sexes, and health: what are the connections—and why does it matter?, International Journal of Epidemiology, Volume 32, Issue 4, 1 August 2003, Pages 652–657, https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyg156

Ernst, M. M., Liao, L. M., Baratz, A. B., & Sandberg, D. E. (2018). Disorders of Sex Development/Intersex: Gaps in Psychosocial Care for Children. Pediatrics, e20174045.

Griffiths, D. A. (2018). Shifting syndromes: Sex chromosome variations and intersex classifications. Social studies of science, 48(1), 125-148.

Asante, M. K. (2003). Afrocentricity: The theory of social change. African Amer Images.

Cannon, C. (2016). A survey of domestic violence perpetrator programs in the United States and Canada: findings and implications for policy and intervention. Partner abuse, 7(3), 226.

Herbert, E. (2018). Black British Women Filmmakers in the Digital Era: New Production Strategies and Re-presentations of Black Womanhood. Open Cultural Studies2(1), 191-202.

Risam, R. (2015). Toxic Femininity 4.0. First Monday, Volume 20, Number 4.

Harms E. The Psychology of Clothes. (Harms 1938) American Journal of Sociology. Vol. 44, No. 2 (Sep., 1938), pp. 239-250 Published by: The University of Chicago Press Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2768730 Page Count:12

Mullins, A. (2009, Jul). PROSTHETIC POWER. Utne, 54-55. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/217408875?accountid=13758

Miller, K. A., Jasper, C. R., & Hill, D. R. (1991). Costume and the perception of identity and role. Perceptual and Motor Skills72(3), 807-813.

Makinde, T. (2004). Motherhood as a source of empowerment of women in Yoruba culture. Nordic Journal of African Studies13(2), 164-174.

Phillips, R. B. (1979). The Sande society masks of the Mende of Sierra Leone (Doctoral dissertation, SOAS University of London).

Aronson, L. (1991). African women in the visual arts. Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 16(3), 550-574.